The Song That Was Playing When Lin-Manuel Miranda Was Conceived

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2017/02/15/the-song-that-was-playing-when-lin-manuel-miranda-was-conceived_n_14774906.html

Lin-Manuel Miranda was not afraid, not at all petrified, to reveal the classic song he was conceived to while on The Ellen Show this week.

On Monday, the “Hamilton” creator told host Ellen DeGeneres the story of how he found out he’d been conceived to “I Will Survive.”

The Ellen Show played the Gloria Gaynor mega hit as Miranda walked on stage, and DeGeneres greeted the actor and composer by saying “that’s your song, ‘I Will Survive.’” Miranda then told the audience the story behind the song.

“So, for a while VH1 was airing American Band Stand a lot and one day ‘I Will Survive’ came on,” Miranda said. “And my parents played that song to death, so I changed the channel. My dad comes running in from the other room and says ‘Don’t you ever change the channel on that song, you were conceived to that song in 1979’.”

Miranda said it was “quite a story” to hear as a teenager. All we can say is that at least now he knows he has all his life to live (and all his love to give) thanks to Gaynor’s signature tune.

Watch Miranda’s full interview with Ellen DeGeneres above. 

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

‘Rings Of Peace’ Surround Canada’s Mosques In Wake Of Deadly Attack

Hundreds of Canadians formed human shields around mosques as Muslims gathered for the first Friday prayers after a deadly attack on an Islamic center in Quebec.

Yael Splansky, senior rabbi at Holy Blossom Temple, Toronto’s oldest Jewish congregation, organized efforts in her community and told reporters that she hoped the “rings of peace” would send a message to Muslim Canadians that they aren’t alone. Splansky said she was inspired by a similar display of solidarity at a mosque in Oslo, Norway, in 2015.

“No Canadian should be afraid to go to their house of worship to pray,” Splansky told Canadian network CTV News on Friday. “It’s a terrifying scene. Imagine people of faith going to pray in peace, to pray for peace and to be at risk. Houses of worship are sacred and must be protected.”

Canada, like the United States, has witnessed a staggering rise in anti-Muslim sentiment and attacks in recent years. This fact became all too real Sunday when a gunman opened fire at the Islamic Cultural Centre of Quebec City, killing six people and injuring 19 others.

Alexandre Bissonnette, a French-Canadian university student known to have far-right, nationalist views, was arrested and charged with six counts of first-degree murder and five counts of attempted murder on Monday. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau characterized the attack as an act of terrorism, telling Muslims: “Thirty-six million hearts are breaking with yours. Know that we value you.” 

Splansky and others took the sentiment to heart. More than 100 people joined Splansky’s group to form a circle of solidarity around the Imdadul Islamic Centre. Similar actions unfolded at a handful of other mosques around the Toronto area and other parts of Canada.

“To see there are people out there — Jews, Christians, people of other faiths or no particular faith, who really care about the Muslim community — I think that says a lot and it’s really reassuring,” Ilyas Ally, assistant imam at Toronto’s Islamic Information and Dawah Centre, told CBC News.

Congregants from a local church and synagogue gathered outside the center on Friday, Ally said, holding hands and forming a human shield during the afternoon prayers.

Ally posted a video on Facebook to show the magnitude of the crowd:

In Newfoundland, hundreds gathered to form a circle of protection around the province’s only mosque. Syed Pirzada, president of the Muslim Association of Newfoundland and Labrador, addressed the crowd and expressed his gratitude for the outpouring of support.

“Although this tragedy has taken an irreparable toll on Muslims across the country, the kindness and generosity of fellow Canadians has been a great source of comfort,” Pirzada said, according to The Guardian. “Canada has spoken: no to hate, no to bigotry, no to religious violence, no to intolerance.”

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

.http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2017/02/03/rings-of-peace-canada-mosques_n_14603870.html
p>Hundreds of Canadians formed human shields around mosques as Muslims gathered for the first Friday prayers after a deadly attack on an Islamic center in Quebec.

Yael Splansky, senior rabbi at Holy Blossom Temple, Toronto’s oldest Jewish congregation, organized efforts in her community and told reporters that she hoped the “rings of peace” would send a message to Muslim Canadians that they aren’t alone. Splansky said she was inspired by a similar display of solidarity at a mosque in Oslo, Norway, in 2015.

“No Canadian should be afraid to go to their house of worship to pray,” Splansky told Canadian network CTV News on Friday. “It’s a terrifying scene. Imagine people of faith going to pray in peace, to pray for peace and to be at risk. Houses of worship are sacred and must be protected.”

Canada, like the United States, has witnessed a staggering rise in anti-Muslim sentiment and attacks in recent years. This fact became all too real Sunday when a gunman opened fire at the Islamic Cultural Centre of Quebec City, killing six people and injuring 19 others.

Alexandre Bissonnette, a French-Canadian university student known to have far-right, nationalist views, was arrested and charged with six counts of first-degree murder and five counts of attempted murder on Monday. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau characterized the attack as an act of terrorism, telling Muslims: “Thirty-six million hearts are breaking with yours. Know that we value you.” 

Splansky and others took the sentiment to heart. More than 100 people joined Splansky’s group to form a circle of solidarity around the Imdadul Islamic Centre. Similar actions unfolded at a handful of other mosques around the Toronto area and other parts of Canada.

“To see there are people out there — Jews, Christians, people of other faiths or no particular faith, who really care about the Muslim community — I think that says a lot and it’s really reassuring,” Ilyas Ally, assistant imam at Toronto’s Islamic Information and Dawah Centre, told CBC News.

Congregants from a local church and synagogue gathered outside the center on Friday, Ally said, holding hands and forming a human shield during the afternoon prayers.

Ally posted a video on Facebook to show the magnitude of the crowd:

In Newfoundland, hundreds gathered to form a circle of protection around the province’s only mosque. Syed Pirzada, president of the Muslim Association of Newfoundland and Labrador, addressed the crowd and expressed his gratitude for the outpouring of support.

“Although this tragedy has taken an irreparable toll on Muslims across the country, the kindness and generosity of fellow Canadians has been a great source of comfort,” Pirzada said, according to The Guardian. “Canada has spoken: no to hate, no to bigotry, no to religious violence, no to intolerance.”

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Your Sunday Is Open Again Because These Puppies Already Decided The Super Bowl

You can rest easy, tune into the Super Bowl for the commercials and tune out for the game, because Jimmy Fallon’s puppies have already decided who the winner will be.

Using a highly scientific method, nine puppies were released onto two food bowls: one labeled “Patriots,” one “Falcons.” And … well, you’ll just have to watch. But, we assure you, the will of the puppies is ironclad.

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2017/02/03/your-sundays-free-again-these-puppies-already-decided-the-super-bowl_n_14598042.html

Angela Merkel’s Censure Of Donald Trump’s Executive Order Puts Theresa May To Shame

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2017/01/30/angela-merkel-theresa-may_n_14498332.html

German Chancellor Angela Merkel issued a strong rebuke of U.S. President Donald Trump’s sweeping executive order blocking travelers from seven predominately Muslim countries.

“The necessary and decisive fight against terrorism does not justify a general suspicion against people of a certain belief ― in this case people of Muslim belief or people from a certain country,” Merkel said at a press conference on Monday. “That way of thinking is against my interpretation of the basic tenants of international refugee support and cooperation.”

Merkel’s statement was quickly compared to the much more tepid response from British Prime Minister Theresa May.

“We do not agree with this kind of approach,” Downing Street said of the ban on Saturday. May met with Trump in Washington, D.C., on Friday, just hours before he signed the executive order. 

The order also puts a freeze on America’s Syrian refugee resettlement program at a time when the crisis is worsening by the day. Germany has taken in over 1 million refugees and migrants from Syria and other areas in conflict since 2015. 

Merkel’s statement reflects a growing divide between her administration and Trump’s. The president has repeatedly criticized Germany’s efforts to bring in refugees, and the German leader has already spoken out about Trump’s ban. The two heads of state talked on the phone over the weekend, and she apparently had to explain to him some pretty basic foreign policy facts.

“The Geneva refugee convention requires the international community to take in war refugees on humanitarian grounds,” a spokesperson for Merkel said. “All signatory states are obligated to do. The German government explained this policy in their call.”

How will Trump’s first 100 days impact you? Sign up for our weekly newsletter and get breaking updates on Trump’s presidency by messaging us here. 

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

NBA Coach Whose Father Was Killed By Extremists Calls Muslim Ban ‘Horrible’

Golden State Warriors’ coach Steve Kerr, whose father was killed by radical Islamists, said that banning Muslims from entering the U.S. is “a horrible idea.”

Kerr said an interview on Sunday that he’s “completely against” President Donald Trump’s executive order blocking entry by people from seven majority-Muslim countries, signed Friday.

“It’s a horrible idea,” he said. “I feel for all the people who are affected. Families are being torn apart.”

Travelers coming from the Middle East, including some green card holders, were detained and questioned at airports across the U.S. in the days after Trump signed the controversial executive action. The order, part of which has already been blocked by multiple federal judges, also placed a temporary freeze on the Syrian refugee resettlement program.

Kerr’s father was the president of the American University in Beirut when he was assassinated in what then-President Ronald Reagan called an “act of terrorists.” As a U.S. citizen who spent years in Middle East, Malcolm Kerr dedicated his life to bridging the gap between the Arabic and Western worlds ― a gap that critics have said Trump’s executive action will widen.

“If we’re trying to combat terrorism by banishing people from coming to this country, we’re going against the principles of what our country’s about and creating fear,” Kerr said. “It’s the wrong way to go about it, if anything we could be breeding anger and terror.”

He added that, “I worry in the big picture what this means to the security of the world. It’s going about it completely opposite.”

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

.http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2017/01/30/steve-kerr-muslim-ban_n_14490676.html
div class=”embed-asset embed” data-type=”embed-asset” data-provider=”Embed” data-title=””>

Golden State Warriors’ coach Steve Kerr, whose father was killed by radical Islamists, said that banning Muslims from entering the U.S. is “a horrible idea.”

Kerr said an interview on Sunday that he’s “completely against” President Donald Trump’s executive order blocking entry by people from seven majority-Muslim countries, signed Friday.

“It’s a horrible idea,” he said. “I feel for all the people who are affected. Families are being torn apart.”

Travelers coming from the Middle East, including some green card holders, were detained and questioned at airports across the U.S. in the days after Trump signed the controversial executive action. The order, part of which has already been blocked by multiple federal judges, also placed a temporary freeze on the Syrian refugee resettlement program.

Kerr’s father was the president of the American University in Beirut when he was assassinated in what then-President Ronald Reagan called an “act of terrorists.” As a U.S. citizen who spent years in Middle East, Malcolm Kerr dedicated his life to bridging the gap between the Arabic and Western worlds ― a gap that critics have said Trump’s executive action will widen.

“If we’re trying to combat terrorism by banishing people from coming to this country, we’re going against the principles of what our country’s about and creating fear,” Kerr said. “It’s the wrong way to go about it, if anything we could be breeding anger and terror.”

He added that, “I worry in the big picture what this means to the security of the world. It’s going about it completely opposite.”

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.